A day trip from London to Stonehenge

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Stonehenge – a British unsolved mystery site is one of the common places to observe Earth from a very different angle. It’s not about the eyesight, it’s about the knowledge. Stonehenge is a key element of English pre-historic heritage.

Image Source: Flickr

What is Stonehenge?

There is strong archaeological evidence that Stonehenge was used as a burial site at some point during its long history, but most scholars believe it also served other purposes, such as a ceremonial site, a religious pilgrimage destination, a final resting place for royalty, or a memorial erected to honour and perhaps spiritually connect with distant ancestors. Last but not least, a location to converse with aliens and other outer-space visitors.

When and Who built Stonehenge?

Image source: Pinterest

Stonehenge is maybe the most well-known ancient monument in the world. The first monument was an early henge monument created around 5,000 years ago, and the distinctive stone circle was established in the late Neolithic period around 2500 BC.

Image Source: YouTube

The monument’s enigmatic background has inspired several stories and speculations. Stonehenge was built by Merlin, the magician of Arthurian mythology, who magically transported the gigantic stones from Ireland, where giants had collected them, according to folklore. Another tale has it that the stones were erected by invading Danes, while another hypothesis has it that they were the remnants of a Roman temple. Modern interpretations are no less colourful: some believe Stonehenge is a spacecraft landing site for aliens, while others believe it is a massive fertility symbol in the shape of female genitalia.

Why does Alien’s theory pop up?

Stonehenge’s largest stones, called sarsens, may stand up to 30 feet (9 metres) tall and weigh up to 25 tonnes (22.6 metric tonnes) on average. The biggest stones like Sarsens were local stones to the location. The bluestones, on the other hand, are thought to have been transported over 200 miles by land from the Preseli Hills in western Wales. Parker Pearson and colleagues have discovered excellent matches for Stonehenge’s bluestones in two Welsh quarries. Not only that, those bluestones even weigh around 2 to 4 tons. It was a challenging matter to transport or adjust this kind of weight 2500 years or 5000 years ago. Even today itself. So, some people believe that this was accomplished with the help of extremely developed alien species.

Image Source: Silent Earth

And we can see similar looking henges across the British isle. And the count was more likely 120. Most of them are not that big like the main one. And the range of Stonehenge is also bigger than you expect. It has more outer circles which is not clearly visible now and some underground parts as well. This mysterious place is always home to my serious legends.

How long does it take to reach Stonehenge from London?

Those driving directly to Stonehenge from downtown London (a distance of around 88 miles) should allow 2 to 2.5 hours, depending on traffic.

Entry to Stonehenge and Ticket Prices

Accessibility of Stonehenge

To go to Stonehenge from London, take the train from London Waterloo to Salisbury, or farther down the line at Clapham Junction. The train from London Waterloo to Salisbury takes around one hour and 25 minutes, while the bus to Stonehenge takes approximately 35 minutes.

Ticket prices of Stonehenge

STONEHENGE ADMISSION PRICES & OPENING TIMES 2022/2023

Open every day of the year, apart from Christmas Day

Admission (off-peak/standard/peak)Opening times
Adult£20.00 / £21.80 / £23.601 May – 31 Aug 20229.30 – 19.00
Child (5-17)£12.00 / £13.00 / £14.105 Sep – 31 Mar 20239.30 – 17.00
Students/ seniors*£18.00 / £19.60 / n/a  
Family ticket†£52.00 / £56.60 / £61.30  

Members of the National Trust & English Heritage enter free. The prices shown are without donations. For donation prices please see the link below for further details.

Last entry 2 hours before closing.

* Students 16-18 years. Seniors 65+

† 2 adults and up to 3 children.

Closed on 25 December.

However, make sure that you arrive at or before 15:00 (3 PM) to guarantee your entry.

Restoration Process of Stonehenge

As British Academic history dated back a thousand years or more, we can believe that the early studies might conducted during the last 1000 years or more.

The Duke of Buckingham conducted the first recorded excavation at Stonehenge, in the monument’s centre, in the 1620s, in response to King James I’s visit. The king then commissioned the architect Inigo Jones to inspect and study the monument. However, I saw some reports that said there was some known research that happened in the 13th century as well.

This large engineering project, as well as the related excavations, began in 1958 and lasted until 1959. The archaeological work was overseen by Atkinson, Piggott, and Stone. The trilithon was re-erected from its previous resting place after 161 years. An upright and a lintel that were part of the outer circle were also replaced. One of the inner horseshoe’s massive sarsens was cast in concrete, and a vast hole at its base was filled. To avoid future movement, the sarsen bases were cemented in concrete. Six fallen bluestones were finally removed and straightened.

Sources: Various Websites and cross-check

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